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Early Australian Voyages

By: John Pinkerton

In the days of Plato, imagination found its way, before the mariners, to a new world across the Atlantic, and fabled an Atlantis where America now stands. In the days of Francis Bacon, imagination of the English found its way to the great Southern Continent before the Portuguese or Dutch sailors had sight of it, and it was the home of those wise students of God and nature to whom Bacon gave his New Atlantis. The discoveries of America date from the close of the fifteenth...

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The Food of the Gods

By: Herbert George Wells

Certainly both Mr. Bensington and Professor Redwood was quite merited any of these terms long before they came upon the marvellous discovery of which this story tells. Mr. Bensington was a Fellow of the Royal Society and a former president of the Chemical Society, and Professor Redwood was Professor of Physiology in the Bond Street College of the London University and had been grossly libelled by the anti-vivisectionists time after time. And both had led lives of academi...

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Rosa Alchemica

By: William Butler Yeats

It is now more than ten years since I met, for the last time, Michael Robartes, and for the first time and the last time his friends and fellow students; and witnessed his and their tragic end, and endured those strange experiences, which have changed me so that my writings have grown less popular and less intelligible, and driven me almost to the verge of taking the habit of St. Dominic. I had just published Rosa Alchemica, a little work on the Alchemists, somewhat in t...

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A Journey to the Center of the Earth

By: Jules Verne

CHAPTER 1. My Uncle Makes a Discovery LOOKING back to all that has occurred to me since that eventful day, I am scarcely able to believe in the reality of my adventures. They were truly so wonderful that even now I am bewildered when I think of them. My uncle was a German, having married my mother's sister, an Englishwoman. Being very much attached to his fatherless nephew, he invited me to study under him in his home in the fatherland. This home was in a large town, and...

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Industrial Germany

By: Hermann Levy

PREFACE: When in January and February 1934 I was lecturing in the University of Cambridge about industrial combination in Germany I became impressed with the idea of dealing more fully with what is at present one of the foremost English industrial problems. As I was one of the first to write on English monopoly organisations and have some knowledge of the special features of the problem in England I felt myself qualified to write a book with the express purpose of compar...

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Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Volume 1

By: Ulysses S. Grant

PREFACE: Man proposes and God disposes. There are but few important events in the affairs of men brought about by their own choice. Although frequently urged by friends to write my memoirs I had determined never to do so, nor to write anything for publication. At the age of nearly sixty-two I received an injury from a fall, which confined me closely to the house while it did not apparently affect my general health. This made study a pleasant pastime. Shortly after, the r...

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A Journey to the Centre of the Earth

By: Jules Verne

Chapter 1: MY UNCLE MAKES A GREAT DISCOVERY. Looking back to all that has occurred to me since that eventful day, I am scarcely able to believe in the reality of my adventures. They were truly so wonderful that even now I am bewildered when I think of them. My uncle was a German, having married my mother's sister, an Englishwoman. Being very much attached to his fatherless nephew, he invited me to study under him in his home in the fatherland. This home was in a large to...

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Tales of Men and Ghosts

By: Edith Wharton

CONTENTS I: The Bolted Door / II His Father's Son / III The Daunt Diana / IV The Debt / V Full Circle / VI The Legend / VII The Eyes / VIII The Blond Beast / IX Afterward -- X The Letters...

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The Three Musketeers

By: Pere Alexander Dumas

AUTHOR'S PREFACE: In which it is proved that, notwithstanding their names' ending in OS and IS, the heroes of the story which we are about to have the honor to relate to our readers have nothing mythological about them. A short time ago, while making researches in the Royal Library for my History of Louis XIV, I stumbled by chance upon the Memoirs of M. d'Artagnan, printed—as were most of the works of that period, in which authors could not tell the truth without the ris...

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Crime and Punishment

By: Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Dostoevsky was the son of a doctor. His parents were very hard- working and deeply religious people, but so poor that they lived with their five children in only two rooms. The father and mother spent their evenings in reading aloud to their children, generally from books of a serious character. Though always sickly and delicate Dostoevsky came out third in the final examination of the Petersburg school of Engineering. There he had already begun his first work, Poor Folk...

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White-Jacket

By: Herman Melville

IT WAS NOT a very white jacket, but white enough, in all conscience, as the sequel will show. The way I came by it was this. When our frigate lay in Callao, on the coast of Peru—her last harbor in the Pacific—I found myself without a grego, or sailor's surtout; and as, toward the end of a three years' cruise, no pea-jackets could be had from the purser's steward; and being bound for Cape Horn, some sort of a substitute was indispensable; I employed myself, for several da...

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Politics and the English Language

By: George Orwell

Now, it is clear that the decline of a language must ultimately have political and economic causes: it is not due simply to the bad influence of this or that individual writer. But an effect can become a cause, reinforcing the original cause and producing the same effect in an intensified form, and so on indefinitely. A man may take to drink because he feels himself to be a failure, and then fail all the more completely because he drinks. It is rather the same thing that...

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Eight Hundred Leagues on the Amazon

By: Jules Verne

CHAPTER I: A CAPTAIN OF THE WOODS: THE MAN who held in his hand the document of which this strange assemblage of letters formed the concluding paragraph remained for some moments lost in thought.

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Mother Owl's Rhymes

By: Kate Perkinson Howard

Excerpt: The idea of sending these rhymes to the hearts of active children came through conversation with a friend on the subject of strengthening the memory, and realizing that children much more readily accept and retain facts in verse or rhyme than in prose. With children as with plants, each mind assimilates food that corresponds to its development. The faculty of stringing words into rhyme, just as you would string beads, putting in here and there a bright one, then...

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Anna Karenina, Vol. 1

By: Leo Tolstoy, Graf

Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way. Everything was in confusion in the Oblonskys' house. The wife had discovered that the husband was carrying on an intrigue with a French girl, who had been a governess in their family, and she had announced to her husband that she could not go on living in the same house with him. This position of affairs had now lasted two days, and not only the husband and wife themselves, but all the members ...

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A Thousand Deaths

By: Jack London

I had been in the water about an hour, and cold, exhausted, with a terrible cramp in my right calf, it seemed as though my hour had come. Fruitlessly struggling against the strong ebb tide, I had beheld the maddening procession of the water-front lights slip by, but now a gave up attempting to breast the stream and contended myself with the bitter thoughts of a wasted career, now drawing to a close. It had been my luck to come of good, English stock, but of parents whose...

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Around the World in Eighty Days

By: Jules Verne

Mr. Phileas Fogg lived, in 1872, at No. 7, Saville Row, Burlington Gardens, the house in which Sheridan died in 1814. He was one of the most noticeable members of the Reform Club, though he seemed always to avoid attracting attention; an enigmatical personage, about whom little was known, except that he was a polished man of the world. People said that he resembled Byron -- at least that his head was Byronic; but he was a bearded, tranquil Byron, who might live on a thou...

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Guide for the Use of the International System of Units

By: Barry N. Taylor

Physics Literature

Excerpt: The International System of Units, universally abbreviated SI (from the French Le Systeme International d?Unites ), is the modern metric system of measurement. Long the dominant measurement system used in science, the SI is becoming the dominant measurement system used in international commerce. The Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act of August 1988 [Public Law (PL) 100-418] changed the name of the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) to the National Institute o...

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Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque, Volume 1

By: Edgar Allan Poe

The epithets Grotesque and Arabesque will be found to indicate with sufficient precision the prevalent tenor of the tales here published. But from the fact that, during a period of some two or three years, I have written five-and-twenty short stories whose general character may be so briefly defined, it can- not be fairly inferred -- at all events it is not truly inferred -- that I have, for this species of writing, any inordinate, or indeed any peculiar taste or pre- po...

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The Rover

By: Joseph Conrad

After entering at break of day the inner roadstead of the Port of Toulon, exchanging several loud hails with one of the guardboats of the Fleet, which directed him where he was to take up his berth, Master-Gunner Peyrol let go the anchor of the sea-worn and battered ship in his charge, between the arsenal and the town, in full view of the principal quay. The course of his life, which in the opinion of any ordinary person might have been regarded as full of marvellous inc...

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