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Leviathan

By: Thomas Hobbes

THE INTRODUCTION: Nature (the art whereby God hath made and governes the world) is by the art of man, as in many other things, so in this also imitated, that it can make an Artificial Animal. For seeing life is but a motion of Limbs, the begining whereof is in some principall part within; why may we not say, that all Automata (Engines that move themselves by springs and wheeles as doth a watch) have an artificiall life? For what is the Heart, but a Spring; and the Nerves...

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A Beleaguered City

By: Margaret O. Oliphant

Excerpt: Chapter 1. THE NARRATIVE OF M. LE MAIRE: THE CONDITION OF THE CITY. I, MARTIN DUPIN (de la Clairiere), had the honour of holding the office of Maire in the town of Semur, in the Haute Bourgogne, at the time when the following events occurred. It will be perceived, therefore, that no one could have more complete knowledge of the facts ? at once from my official position, and from the place of eminence in the affairs of the district generally which my family has h...

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Don Quixote, Iiv33, Illustrated

By: Miguel De Cervantes

Excerpt: We left the great governor angered and irritated by that portrait?painting rogue of a farmer who, instructed the majordomo, as the majordomo was by the duke, tried to practise upon him; he however, fool, boor, and clown as he was, held his own against them all, saying to those round him and to Doctor Pedro Recio, who as soon as the private business of the duke?s letter was disposed of had returned to the room, Now I see plainly enough that judges and governors o...

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Fleetwood; Or, The Stain of Birth. A Novel of American Life

By: Epes Sargent

Excerpt: Thou light of other days, vision joyous though brief, whose voice was music, and whose presence sunshine! on the dusty high?way of life, fatigue arrested my footsteps. I saw a green tree, a grassy knoll, which invited me to repose. I slept and my dreams were happy ones they were of thee!

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Wat Eene Moeder Lijden Kan

By: Hendrik Conscience

Excerpt: Het was uitermate koud in de laatste dagen der maand Januari 1841. De straten der stad Antwerpen hadden haar winterkleed aangenomen en glinsterden van zuivere witheid; de sneeuw viel echter niet bij zachte vlokken, noch verheugde het oog met hare duizend dooreenspelende pluimkens; integendeel, zij viel kletterend en als hagel tegen de vensterglazen der geslotene huizen,?en de bittere noorderwind joeg de meeste burgers, die zich op hunnen dorpel vertoonden, terug...

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State of the Union Addresses

By: Ulysses S. Grant

Excerpt: December 6, 1869 To the Senate and House of Representatives: In coming before you for the first time as Chief Magistrate of this great nation, it is with gratitude to the Giver of All Good for the many benefits we enjoy. We are blessed with peace at home, and are without entangling alliances abroad to forebode trouble; with a territory unsurpassed in fertility, of an area equal to the abundant support of 500,000,000 people, and abounding in every variety of usef...

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An Anonymous Christian : The Kneeling Christian

Preface: A traveller in China visited a heathen temple on a great feast?day. Many were the worshippers of the hideous idol enclosed in a sacred shrine. The visitor noticed that most of the devotees brought with them small pieces of paper on which prayers had been written or printed. These they would wrap up in little balls of stiff mud and fling at the idol. He enquired the reason for this strange proceeding, and was told that if the mud ball stuck fast to the idol, then...

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Squash Tennis

By: Richard C. Squires

Excerpt: Added to an articulateness which equips him to put his experience and knowledge into words, his background in racquet games is broad, longstanding and at a level sufficiently upper echelon to have garnered national championships in three separate bat and ball sports.

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Big Timber

By: Bertrand W. Sinclair

Excerpt: Chapter 1. GREEN FIELDS AND PASTURES NEW The Imperial Limited lurched with a swing around the last hairpin curve of the Yale canyon. Ahead opened out a timbered valley,?narrow on its floor, flanked with bold mountains, but nevertheless a valley,?down which the rails lay straight and shining on an easy grade. The river that for a hundred miles had boiled and snarled parallel to the tracks, roaring through the granite sluice that cuts the Cascade Range, took a wid...

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The History of Landholding in England

By: Joseph Fisher

Introduction: This work is an expansion of a paper read at the meeting of the Royal Historical Society in May, 1875, and will be published in the volume of the Transactions of that body. But as it is an expensive work, and only accessible to the Fellows of that Society, and as the subject is one which is now engaging a good deal of public consideration, I have thought it desirable to place it within the reach of those who may not have access to the larger and more expens...

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Eben Holden : A Tale of the North Country

By: Irving Bacheller

Early in the last century the hardy wood-choppers began to come west, out of Vermont. They founded their homes in the Adirondack wildernesses and cleared their rough acres with the axe and the charcoal pit. After years of toil in a rigorous climate they left their sons little besides a stumpy farm and a coon-skin overcoat. Far from the centres of life their amusements, their humours, their religion, their folk lore, their views of things had in them the flavour of the ti...

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Patty's Butterfly Days

By: Carolyn Wells

Different men are of different opinions; some like apples, some like inions, sang Patty, as she swayed herself idly back and forth in the veranda swing; but, truly-ooly, Nan, she went on, I don't care a snipjack. I'm quite ready and willing to go to the White Mountains,—or the Blue or Pink or even Lavender Mountains, if you like. You're willing, Patty, only because you're so good-natured and unselfish; but, really, you don't want to go one bit. Now, Nan, I'm no poor, pal...

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Caught in the Net

By: Emile Gaboriau

The cold on the 8th of February, 186-, was more intense than the Parisians had experienced during the whole of the severe winter which had preceded it, for at twelve o'clock on that day Chevalier's thermometer, so well known by the denizens of Paris, registered three degrees below zero. The sky was overcast and full of threatening signs of snow, while the moisture on the pavement and roads had frozen hard, rendering traffic of all kinds exceedingly hazardous. The whole g...

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Mr. Pratt

By: Joseph Crosby Lincoln

Excerpt: Chapter 1. THE MASTERS I HEARD about the pair first from Emeline Eldredge, ?Emmie T.? we always call her. She was first mate to the cook at the Old Home House that summer. She come down to the landing one morning afore breakfast and hove alongside of where I was setting in the stern of my sloop, the Dora Bassett, untangling fish lines. She had a tin pail in her fist, indicating that her sailing orders was to go after milk. But she saw me and run down in ballast to swap yarns.

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The Shit Seller by T. Gueulette

By: Frank J. Morlock

Excerpt: LEANDRE. Listen, my dear Harlequin? HARLEQUIN. Yeah, sir, I'm not deaf. LEANDRE. Always joking as usual, but it?s not a question of that, I've always told you my troubles and misfortunes. HARLEQUIN. Yes, sir. LEANDRE. I have some pain, my dear Harlequin, it?s surely not against the charming Isabelle, for never was there a more honest and civil girl, for she loves me always, but yet you know well enough that I usually spend the night with her. HARLEQUIN. Yes, sir...

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My Disillusionment in Russia

By: Emma Goldman

CHAPTER I. DEPORTATION TO RUSSIA: ON THE night of December 21, 1919, together with two hundred and forty-eight other political prisoners, I was deported from America. Although it was generally known we were to be deported, few really believed that the United States would so completely deny her past as an asylum for political refugees, some of whom had lived and worked in America for more than thirty years.

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Uncle Sam's Army Boys in Khaki under Canvas

By: Major Andrew S. Burley

Excerpt: Chapter 1. WATCHFUL WAITING IN CAMP. ?THIS thing is getting some monotonous, Bob, and there?s no use denying it!? ?None of the boys in camp seem to like it a whit better than you do, Sid, for a fact. I hear complaints all around about the inaction.? ?We?re still in Uncle Sam?s service, though the job we were mustered in for guarding the border while Pershing and his Regulars started on that wild goose chase down into Mexico, to round up Villa and his crowd was l...

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Le Monde Comme Il Va, Vision de Babouc

By: Voltaire, 1694-1778

Preface de l'Editeur: Longchamp, secretaire de Voltaire de 1746 a 1754, dit dans ses Memoires [] que Babouc, ou le Monde comme il va, fut compose en 1746, pendant la retraite de Voltaire a Sceaux ; et je n'ai rien trouve qui contredise Longchamp. La plus ancienne edition que je connaisse est celle de 1748, dans le tome VIII de l'edition faite a Dresde des Oeuvres de Voltaire. Ce conte fait aussi partie du Recueil de pieces en vers et en prose, par l'auteur de la tragedie...

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The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, And Instruction Series

By: Jonathan Ingram

Excerpt: Great Milton. [Illustration: Great Milton.] Great Milton, a picturesque village, near Thame, in Oxfordshire, is entitled to notice in the annals of literature, as the family seat of the MILTONS, ancestors of Britain?s illustrious epic poet. Of this original abode, our engraving is an accurate representation. One of Milton?s ancestors forfeited his estate in the turbulent times of York and Lancaster. ?Which side he took,? says Johnson, ?I know not; his descendant...

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Shoes Make the Man

By: Harold A. Davis

JOE McCARTHY knew that he was too good-natured. He had always been that way, He blamed it on his size. Even when he'd been a kid, he'd been extra large for his age. Not being of the bullying type, he'd learned to shrug and smile when youths smaller than himself tried to get tough. He'd never been able to convince himself that it was sporting to hit an opponent he knew he could lick with one hand tied behind his back. It had been just as bad when he was grown. The school-...

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